Stocks are “Supposed” to Bounce

This is going to be a short update as my car has a safety recall and I am late to drop it off. While I was on the look out for a 1000 down day to get the market to the end of the decline and middle of the bottoming process, the bulls jumped when the Dow was down 700+ on Monday and thwarted that attempt. I really wanted to see a full WOOSH lower that ended the day really poorly with perhaps one of CNBC’s SPECIAL Markets In Turmoil evening programming. We didn’t get that, but CNBC did extend market coverage for several additional hours.

Monday’s action was good enough to create a rally, but the jury is far from conclusive if we have enough to support the run to new highs I keep writing about. With so many “key” price levels being breached and closed back above, stocks are “supposed” to rally for a few days into the monthly employment report on Friday. I doubt that rally, if it happens, will say anything important about the bottoming process. The most beaten down sectors and stocks should bounce the most. I would become very concerned if the defensive areas like utilities, staples, REITs and telecom were the leaders.

While I still think Dow 23,000 should be kissed before the real rally begins, I am not dumb enough or arrogant enough to believe that it absolutely has to happen. We’ll see. For now, stocks need to keep the bears at bay and resist closing below Monday’s low. IF that should happen, the market would likely see some trap door selling and that big WOOSH lower.

Finally, there have all kinds of chatter about the “all-important” 200 day moving average being tested on Monday. Ignore it. I will create a slew of charts and post my comments about this indicator of long-term trend either later today or tomorrow.

Gotta run…

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Bottoming Process Continues with Decreasing Momentum

Last week, I wrote about stocks entering the bottoming process. After a decline of 1100 points in the Dow, there was a possibility that the correction which began on January 26 was ending. The only thing I did not want to see was a large up opening with stocks rallying all day. Well, that’s exactly what happened last Monday. It just prolongs the inevitable.

I still believe that there is a good chance of seeing a 1000 point down day, possibly this week or later in April to flush out the remaining sellers and establish a bottom. Dow 23,000 should be coming sooner than later and I would fully expect the pundits and media to focus their talk on the bull market ending and a new bear market beginning. As I continue to mention, that talk should be premature as stocks should not be done making all-time highs just yet.

As the major stock market indices grope for their final lows, I do not think all five will eclipse their February lows. In particular, the S&P 400 and Russell 2000 appear to be sufficiently strong enough to withstand another bout of selling.

On the sector front, although semiconductors are really taking it on the chin of late and especially since the Facebook revelation, there is a chance that they could stay above their February bottom. The same cannot be said of the banks, discretionary and transports which all seem poised for new lows this month.

Turning to my favorite canary in the coal mine, high yield bonds, you can see below that junk bonds are hanging in, but by no means are offering any reassuring clues just yet. Let’s see if they can resist this next round of selling in stocks.

Let’s now take a look at the NYSE Advance/Decline Line which measures participation in the market. With the February lows significantly lower, this indicator is showing less participation as stocks head lower, a positive sign of decreased downside momentum. But just decreased momentum won’t turn the tide.

Another measure of downside participation can be seen below. That’s the number of stocks on the New York Stock Exchange making 52 week lows. In other words, how many stocks are at their lowest price level in a year. You can see a big spike in early February to just under 600 stocks. Today, it’s only 59, another positive sign.

As has been the case all year, the volatility Genie is out of her bottle and she normally doesn’t go back in so quickly. Higher volatility was my theme for 2018 and that will continue to play out. I remain steadfast that the bull market is not over and fresh all-time highs are around the corner. It will be that anticipated rally where the opportunity to end the bull market will be.

This morning, China responded to the Trump administration’s tariffs with their own. As I continue to write, no one wins a trade war and this has the potential to end badly economically, especially as the Fed forges ahead with their unprecedented experiment of hiking interest rates and selling assets. Until recently, I haven’t written about recession in many years. Now, it’s on my radar screen for 2019 or 2020.

 

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

In the Throes of the Bottoming Process

1100 point decline to end the week certainly makes people pay attention. It still feels like yesterday (or late January) when all the talk was about a year long stock market melt up.Tax reform, 700+ regulations killed, GDP accelerating. All paths led higher. Almost every day, Donald Trump celebrated fresh all-time highs and used the stock market as his report card. Oh, the good ole days!

As I wrote about last week, I don’t believe it’s about Facebook or Trump’s revolving door White House or Stormy Whoever. Given that we saw red almost across the entire board, this was a liquidation of assets leaving equities. While Treasury bonds fared fine, it wasn’t the old fashioned flight to quality everyone has become used to seeing over the past 35 years. Crude oil rallied. Gold did too. Agriculture commodities look to be primed to be move higher. In my 2018 Fearless Forecast, I wrote about the very long-term view of commodities and I think they could have a decade-long runway ahead.

Anyway, the Dow was under significant pressure last week and is only a one day decline from my original downside target of 23,000. Interestingly, in a somewhat more complex path than I originally laid out, stocks are back to behaving most like scenario #1 again as shown below. We had the mini-crash followed by the snapback rally that went further than I thought and now a longer than usual revisiting of the mini-crash lows. The final step in the bottoming process is here, assuming my bullish outlook is the correct one, and it could take a few days or longer to solidify.

As such, the major stock market indices are supposed to hammer out a bottom this holiday-shortened week. And it’s really supposed to be on Tuesday or Wednesday if you want to get greedy. It’s as simple as that. With one more SWOOSH lower all of the requisite items would be in place for the low that leads to all-time highs again. And it looks like the Dow and S&P 500 are the most likely candidates to see the final selloff below the February lows while the S&P 400 and Russell 2000 should remain comfortably above those levels. The jury is still out on the NASDAQ 100.

Now, if it were only all that easy!

What is “supposed” to happen and what actually happens sometimes diverge. And comes some counter intuitive analysis. After two bloody days last Thursday and Friday, the best path if you are a bull is for a large down opening on Monday that makes headlines and creates fear. If stocks don’t find buyers after lunch, then a down 1000 would be in the cards. If stocks found buyers after lunch, then a bottom could be cemented by the close. If not, Tuesday would shape up to be the pivotal day.

If stocks up sharply higher, that just prolongs the bottoming process. While it may feel good to see a bounce that would push out the ultimate low until the rally fizzled out and a breach of Friday’s lowest level was seen. In this case, there could be a failing multi-day snapback where all of the talk in the financial media centered around the successful retest of the February lows.

With overnight action in the green so far, it preliminarily appears as though the latter scenario could be unfolding. That’s the more difficult of the two.

Over the past week, I have received an unusually high number of emails regarding my bullish and still positive outlook for stocks over the coming quarter or so. Almost all have been on the negative or opposite side of my view. First, please keep the email and tweets coming! Everyone wins when there is debate. I certainly don’t hold the patent on offering market forecasts and I am always one to listen to other views. My good friends in the industry will attest that when I offer my forecasts to them, I usually ask them how I am going to be wrong. What am I missing.

The other night my son and I had dinner with some ski friends in Vermont who are also industry peers. As usual, my friend Rich and I spent a good deal of time discussing Trump, the economy and of course, the stock market. Sometimes we are in full agreement while other times we are on opposite sides. Never a voice raised or name called unless it’s from our wives. The thing about Rich and me is that it’s not important who ends up being right or wrong. If either one of us can help the other to consider a different scenario or uncover new information we both win. And we both agree that we would happily be wrong forever in our opinions as long as we make money in the markets.

That’s the glaring difference between people who offer market commentary without any consequences and those of us who manage money with the proof being our daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly and annual performance. Commentators, strategists and analysts can dig their heels in and call for a massive decline year after year after year. Eventually, they will be proven correct. If you ran a portfolio like that, the likely scenario would be losing most of your clients’ money and/or being terminated.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

What Happened to the Stock Market Melt Up?

700+ points of Dow decline on Thursday surely did change sentiment quickly. And while stock market bottoms do occur on Fridays (13% of the time), contrary to popular belief, the final low is unlikely to be today. Earlier this week, I discussed how all three of my offered scenarios were breaking down as they all eventually do, I thought the Dow would go check out 24,200 but likely head all the way down towards 23,000 which is below the lows from February. However, I do not believe the other major indices will all exceed their February lows, which creates a non confirmation or divergence.

Sector-wise, semis and banks look the healthiest of the four key ones with transports and discretionary trying to hang on. I am most concerned about the consumer. Defensive stocks have been battered and bludgeoned as much as cyclical ones. And bonds aren’t really offering that safe haven.

As I mentioned on Fox Business yesterday and something I will be writing about for the next two plus years, tariffs are awful economically. No one wins in a trade war. The Fed is raising rates AND selling assets at the same time as the Treasury needs to borrow more money. This is not a good combination and will end poorly if not changed.

Before you out and buy bottled water and canned goods, I still forecast fresh all-time highs in the Dow coming by summer. Sure, I could always be wrong, but the evidence doesn’t support recession and a bear market just yet. That time will come.

Remember when the only talk was about a stock market melt up?!?!

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Scenarios Breaking Down

For the past 6 weeks, I have offered what has now amounted to three plausible scenarios for where stocks are headed over the coming three to four months. While the short-term ups and downs varied, all paths from my perspective ended up at new highs for the major stock market indices. Nothing has changed in this regard and I continue to expect Dow 27,000 by the end of Q2 (June 30).

As with almost every single market analog, eventually, they all break down and find their own path. Remember, markets rhyme all the time but never exactly repeat.

Let’s take a look at the three scenarios we have been watching as they all seem to be breaking down.

If you analyze all three scenarios, you may conclude that stocks seem to be behaving weaker than any of the paths suggest. I would agree with that in the short-term, but not alter my intermediate-term view at all. There are lots of crosscurrents right now, but aren’t there always?

I heard a few pundits as well as anchors opine that Monday’s rout by the bears was all tied to the Facebook news. If that isn’t the single most asinine market statement of the year, I don’t know what is! While Facebook certainly impacted tech stocks, especially those in its own sector, the Facebook data scandal will have absolutely no impact on inflation, GDP, liquidity nor 95% of the companies in the rest of the stock market. You just can’t fix stupid.

Stocks did decline on Monday and Facebook was the story of the day. I am definitely not saying “so what” to the decline as 90% of the volume was in stocks trading to the downside, but I am also not concluding that it was some seminal day and a bear market has begun. Remember, the NASDAQ100 hit an all-time high last week.

Leadership in my four key sectors has been strong with semis seeing an all-time high last week. Banks saw new highs last week. Discretionary and transports are chugging along. With the Dow being the weakest major index, it is certainly not out of the realm of possibilities that it could decline another 1000 points or more and retest its 2018 low. However, in that case I would still expect the other indices to hang well above their 2018 lows. Things will settle down sooner than later.

The Fed is meeting today (Tuesday) and tomorrow with the big announcement at 2:00 PM. I will have my usual special update out shortly.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Nasty, Ugly Reversal

Stock market action on Tuesday printed a classic nasty and ugly reversal when looking at the charts. Stocks opened at the highs for the day and closed at their lows. Additionally, the move from high to low completely enveloped the previous day’s activity. While this does look really bad on a chart and people will often say it’s a classic key reversal which ends rallies and bull markets, research doesn’t support that claim. Sure, you can see and have seen this behavior at some market peaks. However, it has been seen so many other times that it’s track record is very poor. As with many claims, it worth paying attention to, but not always actionable.

Let’s start with the S&P 500 below. You can see what I am talking about just below the arrow. Additionally, the same thing occurred at the little peak in late February.

The Russell 2000 small caps are next and you can see four “key” reversals on the chart with the one at the highest peak leading to the correction. The others led to nothing.

Finally, the NASDAQ 100 is below.

Taken in a vacuum, “key” reversals have more bark than bite. However, when combined with other indicators and research, they may be able to support a thesis. In today’s case, I think we could see some mild weakness which ends up totaling 1-3%, but that should be another buying opportunity for a run to new highs. The NASDAQ 100 is already there and the Russell 2000 was a whisker away.

Tomorrow, I will review sector leadership along with junk bonds and the NYSE A/D line.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

2018 Looking A Lot Like 1997

As you know, I have been hanging my hat on two scenarios for the market since early February. I updated those yesterday. While both scenarios still lead to Dow 27,000 by the end of Q2, I searched long and hard for further evidence to support my thesis. I love finding market analogs, but there haven’t been many to what transpired over the past 6 weeks.

1997 seems like the most favorable comparison and when I lined them up, it looked fairly strong. Below you can see 1997 followed by current stock market action. I added labels for emphasis. While the rally in 1997 wasn’t as powerful as we saw recently, it was still a solid rally, mini crash, reversal and mild retest. That mild retest fooled a lot of people into thinking that more weakness was coming toward Dow 23,500. On balance, stocks should continue higher although a brief 1-2% pullback should be expected this month.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

I’m Back! Dow Still Going to 27,000

I want to start off by thanking everyone for the overwhelming support, compassion and number of condolences on my dad’s passing. It has been a difficult few weeks both pre and post funeral and Shiva,  but my family and I were tremendously comforted by so many people coming out of the woodwork with calls, cards, texts, emails, donations to his favorite charities and an amazing amount of stories about my dad, many of which I was hearing for the first time.

While my writing had gone dark for the past 10 days we have been very active with our portfolios. When I left off on March 1 we had dramatically reduced our exposure to stocks just as the market was beginning it’s last little 1000 point plunge. I mentioned that we were keenly watching events unfold for an opportunity to redeploy that cash. Little did I know that the moment would come less than a day later as stocks were hammering out a bottom just above Dow 24,200. So far, both moves seem to have been very fortuitous.

Let’s return to what has become my favorite two charts and scenarios. The first was the preferred path until I relegated it to number two a few weeks ago. Stocks were closely following my arrows for a while.

The chart above became my number one scenario and except for the latest bout of weakness going a bit deeper than thought, this one seems to be on target for now. Remember, regardless of which scenario wins out or if a new one becomes possible, I have said all along that all paths lead to fresh all-time highs for stocks by the end of Q2. I have written it here as well as pounded the table about it on Fox Business and CNBC. No wavering here. The bull  market remains alive.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Breakout Alert for Stocks. Yields NOT Peaking

After Friday’s dominance by the bulls and the very early Monday morning follow through, the bulls are on the verge of negating what has been my preferred scenario and instead opting for scenario number two below. Since a called the bottom a few weeks ago, I drew the two horizontal blue lines on the chart below and have not changed them at all. Those represent a trading range where I thought stocks would bounce in as volatility began to subside here and there, but remain elevated from pre-correction levels.

If my preferred scenario was going to continue to play out, stocks should not close above the top of the volatility range. As you can see from the farthest right green candle, price is there right now. Should that remain the case, scenario number two moves to number one and number one becomes null and void.  Lots going on today and this week. It’s time to really pay attention.

As I mentioned on Friday, volume has been pretty pathetic on the rally, but leadership has been very strong. While both matter, I can reconcile these by saying that volume is more short-term than leadership. Semis, banks and discretionary all seem poised for new highs while transports have a lot of work to do to repair the damage that was done. They certainly are in no rush.

Finally, there has been way too much talk from stock pundits and analysts about the bond market. That always gets my ears up. The yield on the 10 year Treasury note had soared a tick below 3% which seems to be everyone’s line in the sand. However, over the past few days, it has settled back to 2.84%. I absolutely do not believe we have seen the peak in yields yet and 3%+ will be seen and fretted about sooner than later.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Stock Market Approaching Critical Juncture. Eyes Open!

It’s Friday of a holiday-shortened week and even more so for me as I spent Tuesday and Wednesday in New Orleans with some fellow UCONN crazies eating, enjoying a few adult beverages, playing golf and watching the women dismantle Tulane, my wife’s alma mater. It was a good break from winter in New England, but Mother Nature seems to have lost her ferocity up here and it’s been more like March and April.

 

Speaking of my wife, Teri, I want to wish her the happiest of birthdays and the best year ever ahead! She’s my best friend, love of my life and most incredible mother, even when screaming at our teenage daughter. Until death do us part, or she kills me…

Tulane passed out these BEAT UCONN towels, so of course, we accepted ours. We took a bunch of pics holding these and all but the one below had us both looking at the camera with a somewhat normal pose. This one, however, pretty much describes our relationship. I am the jokester who starts everything and she joins in, almost in disbelief of feeding my immaturity. Anyway, the towels made great napkins for the muffuletta from Central Grocery.

Before I send a full canaries in the coal mine which will be print very long because of all the charts, I wanted to send this update on what’s becoming two very familiar charts. The first one below remains my preferred scenario which calls for the rally to end, well, right about now with a return to the bottom of the volatility range in March. My initial downside target is Dow 23,000. From there, I see a very strongly rally to all-time highs with Dow 27,000 by the end of Q2 and a shot at 30,000 by Labor Day.

How will I be wrong?

If the Dow closes above the top of the volatility range which is essentially above last week’s high, I think this scenario will move down to number two on the list. Let’s call that Dow 25,500.

The other scenario I have offered is below and would move to number one if the Dow closes above 25,500 this month. This one calls for the bottom to be in with only mild weakness before closing well above the top of the volatility range on its way to Dow 27,000, all-time highs, sooner than later.


Both scenarios being offered end with new highs and at least Dow 27,000. The bull market remains alive and reasonably well. If the first scenario plays out, you can bet that the masses will be calling the end of the bull market right around Dow 24,000.

A few additional things of note. First, the rally in stocks has not been with enough enthusiasm. There doesn’t seem to be strong conviction. While there is no rule saying there absolutely has to, it does give me some background concern. Maybe a day where 90% of the volume is in advancing stocks is coming next month, or even two with 80%.

Stocks sold off into the close last Friday, the day before a holiday weekend. That’s atypical and suggests that all is not perfectly well. However, several times I said we need to watch which groups lead the market higher off of the bottom. So far, banks, semis, software, internet, discretionary, materials, biotech and healthcare have been leading. In other words, strong “risk on” sectors which usually lead a healthy advance.

On the flip side, staples, telecom, REITs, utilities, energy and transports have all lagged since February 8. The first four are all defensive in nature and healthy to lag at this stage. The last two are somewhat of a head scratcher as lower energy is good for transports but transports are very economically sensitive.

Stocks are approaching a critical juncture. Next week will be key.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE