Double Reversal of the Reversal

On Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday we saw three separate reversals in the major stock market indices. First, there was a “key” downside reversal after a nice little rally, followed by back to back days of stock selling off early and closing strong. Long time market analyst, Walter Deemer, very aptly replied to one of my tweets that it’s not so much the reversal itself, but the action after those wilder, more emotional days.

People love to cherry pick and and point out reversals at major market tops and bottoms because they worked so perfectly. However, there are many others which see no follow through and the market quickly resumes its trend. My point is that when you see a reversal, it’s time to pay a little closer attention and look for other indicators that support that position.

Stocks are basically chopping sideways with the NASDAQ 100 looking to have the best opportunity for an upside move. The Friday before a long weekend typically has an upward bias so I am watching to see if that fails to materialize and what Tuesday holds. Semis and discretionary are already breaking out and transports are close. Oil looks tired after an epic run but I don’t think the rally is over. After the pullback, energy should see new highs. The energy stocks are a different story. Most bonds are very quietly rallying nicely although junk bonds continue to look like garbage. You already know about my concerns there.

Wishing you a safe and enjoyable long weekend full of family, food and fun.

Thank you to all those who have served our country so courageously, especially those who gave their lives for our freedom.

Paul

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

“Key” Reversals. Junk Bonds Still Stink

Let’s start with junk bonds. While they don’t really stink, they are not participating at all in the stock rally. As I mention time and time again, that has little value in the short-term and no predictive power. However, it does matter, and sometimes a lot, over the intermediate-term. My fear, well I am really not scared but rather concerned, is that the final peak in high yield bonds has already been seen. If that’s the case, it doesn’t bode well for the bull market in stocks passed 2019 which would fit in with my thought of recession coming.

On the equity side, while stocks jumped out of the gate on Monday on temporary aversion of the trade war with China, the stock market certainly did  not trade well that day with no index closing at or near the high of the day. On Tuesday, we saw another one of those “key” reversals where stocks open at their highs for the day and close near their lows. It looks ugly on a chart as you can see below in the Russell 2000 Index of small caps which has been the leader. While stocks typically do see weakness after reversals, it’s nothing like the gloom and doom so many technical pundits call for after this one day pattern triggers.

A few of our short-term models turned negative on Monday and Tuesday so I am going to temper my enthusiasm for now. While I remain steadfast that fresh all-time highs are ahead above Dow 27,000, I think some caution is warranted here.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Pause Ending?

With news out that Trump Tariff Tantrum has been delayed, stocks around the globe are rallying roughly 1%. That’s the expectation when trading begins for the new week. It will be telling to see if all five major stock market indices can score new highs for the month which would give the bulls more credibility. I would really like to see another index besides the Russell 2000 see all-time highs right now.

Additionally, on the far right side of the chart, it’s important for the former technology leader, NASDAQ 100, to at least keep pace on the upside if not lead outright. It will go a long way if this index can close above the light blue and dark blue lines which will set it on a course to all-time highs next month.

On the sector front, semis are doing “fine” but could be doing better. Banks seem poised to lead and score new 2018 highs before long. Ditto for discretionary. Transports, as I mentioned last week, look “juicy” and are also in a strong position to take off to the upside and lead stocks on an assault higher. As I continue to mention, only junk bonds give me cause for concern over the intermediate-term.

Stocks should move higher this week into the unofficial beginning of summer. If they do, I will watch to see if sentiment gets on the giddy side or if skepticism remains. That should tell us a lot about the rally’s duration.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Small Caps Still Leading But…

The mild pullback/consolidation continues although you wouldn’t know from watching the Russell 2000 small cap index below. This index sits at all-time highs as seen above the dark blue horizontal line as well as breaking higher above the light blue line which has contained price since the early Q1 correction. On the surface things look really good for small caps as they are leading. However, I do think their leadership is close to ending with the other major indices about the step up.

Even beneath the surface with the NYSE A/D Line, things are just fine. Stocks should be insulated from any major carnage for a while. Only the continuing plight of junk bonds has me a little concerned. They just cannot seem to lift their heads at all. While that doesn’t mean much in the short-term, it does have implications the longer this behavior lasts.

I was planning on doing a post on the recent spike in bond yields, but that will have to wait until next week as I am way past my self imposed deadline on an important report to clients.

Have a great weekend.

Hoping that we get two straight days without rain sometime soon!

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Pause to Refresh. Transports Looking Juicy

It looks like Monday’s failure by the bulls put in a short-term peak and stocks will either trade sideways for a bit or pullback below Tuesday’s low. There shouldn’t be too much price deterioration. We have some overbought readings in the major indices so if stocks can resist much weakness, that could speak volumes about the next move which should be to new  highs.

On the key sector front, banks and discretionary are quietly stepping up while semis appear to need a rest. Transports may be the most interesting of the lot as this week was the fourth time they tried to get through 10,850 on that index. My sense is that on the fifth try, this key sector will blast through and head to new highs, perhaps in July or August.

The only significant concern I have now is the same one I have had, high yield bonds. They are not leading and barely rallying. While this behavior can sometimes warn falsely or even warn for more than a year, it’s something to keep front and center as my favorite canary in the coal mine.

In Friday’s piece, I will spend some time on the recent spike in yield on the 10 year Treasury note which has everyone’s attention.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Stocks on Fire! Not So Much High Yield Bonds

Monday picked up where Friday left off. Strong action in the major indices with the small caps following through from Friday’s burst higher. Even the European indices broke out to new highs. Emerging markets have not and are definitely looking tired. All four key sectors look good with the semis really trying to regain the top spot.

High yield bonds, one of my favorite canaries in the coal mine, are the primary fly in the ointment as they cannot seem to get out of their own way lately. Having last seen new highs early in Q4, it looks like they are being held up by stocks and certainly not leading them. Until I see contagion, I won’t become too concerned but it is something to keep a close eye on.

While I was channel surfing the business stations this morning, I couldn’t help but notice that every single pundit has suddenly become a long-term bull on stocks because of the tax bill. Time and time again, they were asked for their worst case scenarios and not a single one could come up with anything significant on the downside for the economy or stocks. That in of of itself is very, very dangerous group think! More on sentiment later. But WOW!

On a final note, UCONN women’s basketball coach, Geno Auriemma goes for his 1000th victory tonight against Oklahoma in the Hall of Fame Holiday Classic. Let’s go Huskies!

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Bounce Coming But Pullback Still Secure

While the short-term pullback continues, stocks are seesawing back and forth and are “supposed” to bounce here. For the past two trading days, the bears were unable to follow through from Thursday’s decline and fought the bulls to a draw. Unless we are looking at something bigger on the downside than I expect, we should see the bulls step up in a small way. It will be interesting and perhaps telling to see which of the major indices lead and lag the bounce. Both the S&P 400 and Russell 2000 are still in the doghouse.

On the sector front, it’s an uglier story with only the semis remotely hanging in. Banks and transports are already breaking down and discretionary isn’t too far behind. Only utilities look strong here and that’s not what should be leading if the rally were on solid ground. Should the semis lose it, I would think the overall stock market decline to quickly resume to its next downside level, roughly 3% lower.

Looking at my favorite canary in the coal mine, high yield bonds are trying to make a higher high, however I do not believe it’s going to hold. Momentum on down days just overwhelms up days and the intermediate-term pattern isn’t inspiring confidence.

There are more than a few cracks in the pavement which need to be repaired before the next rally begins. I would use little bounces to reposition portfolios. I would not chase stocks higher.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Pullback Remains in Place. Junk May Hold Key.

The short-term pullback I have seemingly written about for weeks and weeks remains in place although I am certainly not taking credit for calling it in a timely fashion. The Dow, S&P 500 and NASDAQ 100 have all pulled back constructively while the S&P 400 and Russell 2000 are uglier. The three stronger indices are just about to kiss their 21 day moving averages, while their weak cousins knifed right through the 21 as well as their 50 day moving averages. While the 3-5% pullback I keep talking about is here, the average stock is now off roughly 10% which is masked by the strength in the major indices.

Turning to the four key sectors, banks, semis and discretionary are holding up very well and only a solid two day rally or so from new highs. Transports, however, are under more pressure although certainly not bull marketing ending behavior.

Both high yield bonds and the NYSE A/D Line saw all-time highs in early March, but have since pulled back more significantly which is something I discussed recently. The junk bond decline definitely has my attention and should be watched very closely. The sector began to lag last week and is now down sharply this week.

The A/D Line, while weak, is still behaving constructively.

Stocks are finally pulling back and giving all those folks who sold last February, post-BREXIT and at the election a time to buy. I doubt they will until the train leaves the station again. The bull market isn’t over.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Window for Decline Almost Closed

For the past three weeks, our models have been defensive regarding the stock market after the first week’s post-election surge. I often say that when certain conditions are present, a “window of opportunity” opens for a stock market decline. The longer time passes without a decline, the more likely the window will close. Today, the window is starting to close and I imagine that by two weeks from today, it will be fully closed, modest decline or not.

The  Dow, S&P 500, S&P 400 and Russell 2000 are all in gear to the upside and look strong, although definitely overbought. The NASDAQ 100, on the other hand, has given back all of its post-election hoopla and just doesn’t behave well. While that bellwether index is dominated by Apple, Amazon, Facebook, Microsoft and Google, which have been under strong downside pressure, it would be careless to dismiss this as just a few bad apples (no pun intended). It remains a red flag for now.

Looking at my four key sectors, banks, discretionary and transports are all acting very well and indicating good things for the bull market. Only semiconductors are questionable, however, they really haven’t done anything terribly wrong except see an outsized down day last Thursday. Further supporting excellent leadership is the performance of the materials, industrials and energy. With the defensive staples, utilities and REITs continuing to lag the rally, that adds further credence to the longevity of the bull market. I do think, however, that a short-term trading opportunity may exist as the Fed raises rates next  Wednesday and the most beaten down sectors begin to rally on that news.

High yield bonds are finally starting to kick it into high gear after breaking out to the upside on Tuesday. Even the NYSE Advance/Decline Line is ever so slowly inching back toward an all-time high. Unless something dramatically changes over the coming week, weakness is a must buy into January.

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

Seasonals Favor Bulls into Weekend

Today and Friday are well known and widely followed seasonally strong days for stocks. That doesn’t mean we should just blindly buy and hope things work out. Stocks have been almost straight up since the election so you can certainly argue that a lot of fuel has been used up, including the last two days. As I mentioned on Monday, if the stock market was down on Tuesday I would have wanted to be long on Wednesday and Friday. That’s not the case.

Stocks are super overbought, but they can still get even more overbought. The signs of a tired market price-wise aren’t showing up just yet although that doesn’t mean there can’t be a pullback. There’s just no solid edge here. Almost every non-defensive sector except healthcare and biotech is breaking out. Leadership is very strong.

High yield bonds are finally stepping up, but more work needs to be done. The NYSE A/D Line is making new post-election highs, but it’s still not close to the all-time highs it needs.

ad

IF the window for a decline closes over the coming few weeks, I would expect the aforementioned high yield bonds and NYSE A/D Line to score all-time highs by mid-January. That would give the bull market another strong indications of staying power.

Wishing you a happy, healthy and meaningful Thanksgiving surrounded by those important in your life!

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE

If you would like to be notified by email when a new post is made here, please sign up HERE