Fed to Stand Pat – Still Operating on Powell’s Dramatic Change

What to Expect Today

The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) is going to do absolutely nothing today at 2:00pm regarding interest rates. The market is expecting nothing and nothing it will get. Any other action would be a total and complete shocker. In fact, at this point, the market isn’t pricing in any FOMC action until the very end of 2020 where a rate cut is expected. Keep in mind that market expectations even a quarter out don’t amount to much, let alone a full year out.

With stocks so close to all-time highs, this continues to be reminiscent of 1995 when the Fed came from an overly restrictive monetary policy in 1994 to realizing they screwed up and quickly played catch up. Stocks had long understood and priced this in with 1995 being one of the all-time great investing years in modern history.

Right after the Fed announces their decision,the usual parsing of every single word and change from the last statement on October 30 will take place. In this regard, I do not expect much in the way of market moving news.

Invoking Paul Volcker

On October 30, Powell & Co. basically said that they were not going to raise rates again until inflation at least met their 2% target. Moreover, they opened the door for inflation to exceed their target before they took action. In other words, the Fed is now okay with inflation running a little “hot”. How almost ironic that in the period that the FOMC not only begs for inflation, but wants it “hot”, former Fed Chair Paul Volcker passes away. Many will remember Volcker as the Fed savior in the 1980s who kept raising and raising interest rates to combat what had been very troublesome inflation. Some will remember those W.I.N. buttons which stood for Whip Inflation Now. Short-term interest rates rose to almost 20%. I personally remember money market rates in the teens as I first invested my bar mitzvah gifts before moving to stocks. You can look at the chart below to see the history of short-term interest rates controlled by the Fed.

I remember my grandfather buying a lot of triple tax free New York City municipal bonds in the late 1970s and early 1980s which were yielding more than 25% as the city was on the verge of bankruptcy. He told the family one holiday that the United States would never, ever allow the most powerful and prominent city on earth to default. I had no idea what it meant at the time, but he was certainly right. As the years went on, he would see bond after bond be called away and/or finally mature in what he always said was the investment of a lifetime. Until he passed in 1999, he would often complain about the paltry single digit yields from newer muni bonds although he ended up buying Mobil with its fat dividend yield with some of the proceeds.

Model for the Day

As with every Fed statement day, 90% of the time stocks stay in a plus or minus .50% range until 2pm before the fireworks take place. I fully expect that to be the case today. Besides that, there is also a strong long-term trend for stocks to close the day higher, although that is not as strong as it used to be. Additionally, with stocks near all-time highs and significant upside progress over the past month, the bulls have even less dry powder than normal, not to mention how poorly stocks have done under Jay Powell on Fed day. In his short tenure as Fed chair, Powell already has the weakest stock market performance of any Fed chair in history on Fed day although stocks did rally on October 30th.

Below is a wonderful chart courtesy of the great Rob Hanna from Quantifiable Edges @quantedges which shows just Fed day stock market performance by Fed Chair. While Powell’s tenure is young, it is not enviable for the bulls.

Countdown to a Trump Tweet

It’s certainly no secret that the President isn’t the biggest fan of Jay Powell, even though Donald Trump appointed Powell as Fed chief. Trump has been as misguided as Powell when it comes to interest rates. The President has been publicly trying to shame the Fed into copying the failing and disastrous European model for negative interest rates, something I hope and pray never, ever happens in the U.S. Low or negative interest rates are certainly not an economic panacea.

On the other hand, whether intentional or by accident, President Trump has been ingenious in creating a natural scapegoat for any potential economic weakness before the election. If the economy strengthens over the coming quarters, Trump will certainly take credit for it, in spite of his perception that the Fed had been working against him. If the economy weakens from here, the President will obviously blame Powell & Company as Trump has been publicly campaigning for more aggressive action by the Fed. In either case, Trump likely wins in the court of public opinion.

The Fed – Savior of the Financial Markets

Now, you can argue that it’s not the Fed’s job to appease the financial markets and you would technically be correct. The Fed has a dual mandate from Congress. Price stability (inflation) and maximum employment. However, the Fed, for the most part, usually follows what the markets want and have priced in. I say “usually” because there have been a few times when the Fed has gone off book.

Jay Powell began his term as Fed chief by essentially saying that enough was enough and he wasn’t going to be beholden to the markets. And to his credit, he did live up to that statement all the way to January 2019 when his famous or infamous 170 degree turn took place after stocks saw that very minor decline of “only 20%” in short order. Then, much to his supporters chagrin, Jay Powell turned into Janet Yellen, Ben Bernanke and good ole Al Greenspan all wrapped up into one. He waved the white flag, much to President Trump’s delight, and declared that he was simply going to give the market what it wanted going forward. The last part is an exaggeration, but that’s effectively what he did.

Something must happen when one becomes the most powerful central banker on earth. The term “not on my watch” is taken to a new level. No one wants to be the one who kills the golden goose of a rising stock market, extended business cycle if you can even use that term anymore and general prosperity. And this all happens with the quiet understanding of “whatever it takes”. So many of us have poked fun and criticized former European Central Bank Chair Mario Draghi for essentially saying the exact same thing when it came to saving the Euro currency. At least he had the gumption to overtly state it.

The Fed doesn’t want to upset the financial markets. And that’s understandable. These markets are absolutely vital the U.S. and global economies. And despite what you may hear from Lizzie Warren and Bernie Sanders, a healthy and vibrant Wall Street community is an absolute necessity to a growing economy, even though that same group is prone to bouts of greed and bad behavior which can have a periodic and significant detrimental impact on the economy (see chapter on how the financial crisis began in 2007 and 1929).

When politicians from both sides talk about how Wall Street “wrecked” the economy, they always forget how many direct and indirect jobs were created from Wall Street’s work. The problem is that we (the U.S.) always seems to reward bad behavior and don’t punish it. And so many politicians continue to pat themselves on the back for the Dodd-Frank piece of legislation which did good by increasing capital standards but failed miserably by declaring victory that the days of Wall Street bailouts were over. Not a chance.

When push comes to shove, the political will is never there to let a Morgan Stanley or a Goldman potentially take down the economy. In real time in 2008, my thesis was that AIG should not have been saved which would have sent Goldman down with it. I thought letting more institutions be punished would have caused more short-term pain, but the free market would picked up the slack and the economy would have seen a much, much better recovery than it did. A topic for a different day.

Dual Mandate

As I already mentioned above, the fed has a dual mandate from Congress. Regardless of what President Trump believes or wants, the Fed’s instructions are from Congress. When we look at the Fed’s dual mandate, Congress essentially directs the Fed to keep inflation manageable and seek to have the country fully employed.

Right now, unemployment is at or near record lows with minority unemployment also at or near the lowest levels since records began. That is maximum employment, a point where the Fed would normally worry about a labor shortage and a spike in wages. While wages are finally rising, we are not seeing a squeeze and nothing like McDonalds paying signing bonuses like we saw years ago. With half of the Fed’s mandate pointing towards a rate hike, it’s makes me wonder.

Looking at price stability (inflation), we see the same trend that has been in place for more than a decade; inflation cannot seem to get going. While many people are familiar with the Consumer Price Index, the chart below is a much better gauge and you can Google if you want more info about it. The blue line excludes food and energy and this CENTURY you can’t find a single year of 3%. The very random Fed target of 2% has barely been met since the financial crisis.

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Boring Fed Day On Tap

Model for the Day

As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Six meetings ago was one of the rare times where the models strongly called for a rally on statement day which was correct as well as a decline a few days later which was also correct.

Today, as with most statement days, the first model calls for stocks to return plus or minus 0.50% until 2:00 PM. There is a 90% chance that occurs. The next model calls for stocks to close higher today and rally after 2:00 PM. That is usually a very strong trend, 75%+, however with the bulls using a lot of energy over the past few weeks, that trend’s power has been muted significantly to less than 50%. That’s not exactly the kind of trend worth trading.

Finally, there may be a trend setting up for a post statement day decline, but there are a number of factors that still need to line up.

No Rate Hike But Balance Sheet Taper…

Janet Yellen and her friends at the Fed have done an excellent job of preparing the markets for interest rate hikes this year. There haven’t been any surprises on that front. Recently, they have been chatting up a storm regarding a plan to reduce the size of the Fed’s $4 trillion plus balance sheet. You can expect to hear a little more about this in their statement today after they leave rates unchanged. With the Fed’s annual Jackson Hole retreat about a month away, Yellen and Company should continue to prepare the markets for a formal announcement in six weeks with lots of information released at Jackson Hole.

 

Velocity of Money Still Collapsing

Turning to a chart I continue to show time and time again, below is a long-term chart of the velocity of money (M2V) produced by the St. Louis Fed. In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.

This single chart definitely speaks to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets.

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Stocks Looking Down After Rate Hike

Everything happened as expected on Wednesday. Stocks stayed in a tight range until 2PM. The Fed raised rates. Yellen spoke about reducing the balance sheet. And the bullish Fed trend was significantly muted. Given how stocks closed, there is a very short-term trend which indicates lower prices today and possibly into next week. However, with the stock market set to open lower, the opportunity to take advantage is likely gone.

The Dow is now the leading index and that’s not the index which typically leads in the healthiest of markets. I don’t expect this to continue. Mid caps have really started stepping up with small caps not looking as dead as they did a short time ago. The NASDAQ 100, on the other hand, looks like it has more downside ahead with some sideways movement coming after that.

As I always say, it’s not what the news actually is, but rather how stocks react. On Fed day, we saw good behavior from industrials, healthcare, home builders, banks, staples, discretionary, REITs and utilities. Read that sentence again. For the most part, those are not the same leaders as we have seen. Rather than the rally ending, it looks like it’s morphing after two “shock” days (big down days out of nowhere) in tech over the past month.

Now, tech may be done leading for a while, but it doesn’t look like the rally is over. Sure, we could see a pullback, but that would be yet another buying opportunity in a long line of successful opportunities.

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Fed to Hike Rates Today In Spite of Falling Inflation. Dow 23,000 Next

Model for the Day

As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Five meetings ago was one of the rare times where the models strongly called for a rally on statement day which was correct as well as a decline a few days later which was also correct.

Today, as with most statement days, the first model calls for stocks to return plus or minus 0.50% until 2:00 PM. There is a 90% chance that occurs. The next model calls for stocks to close higher today and rally after 2:00 PM. That is usually a very strong trend, 75%, however with the bulls using a lot of energy over the past few days, that trend’s power has been muted significantly.

Finally, there may be a trend setting up for a post statement day decline, but there are a number of factors that still need to line up.

It’s also June option expiration week which has historically added a nice tailwind to stocks. So far, that tailwind has been seen just on Tuesday.

1/4% Hike Against Mixed Economic Picture

Janet Yellen and her friends at the Fed have done an excellent job of preparing the markets for another rate hike today. They have been chatting up a storm in their speeches and it’s also Yellen’s quarterly news conference and economic outlook update. I would be shocked if more than Neel Kashkari dissented.

While most pundits forecast two rate hikes in 2017, I have been very clear that those expectations are too low. In my 2017 Fearless Forecast, I offered that,

“While the market is pricing in at least two rate hikes this year, I think they are on the low side. I would not be surprised to see a minimum of four increases in 2017 with the risk to the upside.”

The flaw in my thinking is that I did not believe a change in the balance sheet would be a 2017 event. We will likely hear otherwise from Janet Yellen today. Markets are expecting to learn of a plan outline to begin to curb asset purchases by the Fed sooner than later. That should eventually lead to letting assets organically roll off the balance sheet rather than outright sales in the open market. The markets would be very surprised and caught off guard if Yellen speaks about a plan to sell bonds in the open market any time soon.

I would say that today’s move has a 95%+ certainty. The Fed is going to raise the Federal Funds Rate today by .25%. Banks will then raise the prime lending rate and other rates will move off that. While the economy continues to improve, Q1 GDP was less than stellar although recently revised higher. My own work suggests that Q2 could see GDP grow close to 3% with Q3 perhaps even higher.

Monthly job creation has been very strong in four of the past five months. Only March was a lemon. I expect the growth trend to continue. The official unemployment rate hasn’t been lower since 2001 and the “real” rate or U6 is down to 8.4%, the lowest since 2007. This data certainly support a hike.

The chink in the armor and what Neel Kashkari may cite if he votes against the hike is the recent decline in inflation. From a 5 year high of 2.7% in February, the consumer price index declined in March, April and May to 1.9%. That is exactly what the Fed does not want to see as it tries to normalize interest rates.

Velocity of Money Still Collapsing

Turning to a chart I continue to show time and time again, below is a long-term chart of the velocity of money (M2V) produced by the St. Louis Fed. In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.

This single chart definitely speaks to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets.

The Secret Behind Low Rates

Continuing to raise rates, as I have written about over and over, also makes our currency a lot more attractive to foreigners. Remember, money flows where it’s treated best. Since early 2008 here, in www.investfortomorrowblog.com and on the various financial channels, I have been a devout secular bull for the dollar, even when trillions were being manufactured by the Fed. For years, I sat alone in my bullish house before having company over the past few years.

As I have written about, I truly believe that one of the main reasons Yellen and her inner circle worry about raising rates is because they are terrified of massive capital flows into the U.S. as the dollar index breaks out above par (100) which is already did and travels to 110, 120 and possibly higher, somewhat like tech stocks did during the Dotcom boom.

Below is a chart I continue to show at each FOMC meeting. While Dollar Index bounced around between the blue lines after that huge rally on the left side of the chart, all was very well and that was normal and expected behavior. When price broke above the blue line late last year, I thought the next big move had started. I was clearly and definitely wrong.

In the strongest bull markets, price should not have declined much below 100. This has been an unexpected turn for the worse. However, I am not ready nor close to being ready to abandon my long-term positive position. If my view is going to continue to pan out, the dollar will likely spend some time going sideways before gathering itself for a run to 104 and then much higher in 2018 and 2019.

I still forecast that the final bull market price peak lies ahead and at least towards the 120 level. Nothing has changed in my long-term view that the Euro will ultimately fall to all-time lows below .80 and the Pound under par. Those are the same long-term targets from 2008.

A soaring dollar would be great in the short-term for all except those who export goods. Our standard of living would go up. Companies with U.S.-centric businesses would thrive. Foreigners would buy dollars in staggering amounts at a dizzying pace which I argue would make their way into large and mega cap U.S. stocks. Think Dow 23,000 (my most recent target), 25,000 and possibly 30,000.

What’s so bad about that?

Eventually too much of a good thing becomes problematic. In this case, mass dislocations in the global markets would grow and that would almost certainly lead to a major global financial crisis later this decade. Think many elephants trying to squeeze out of a room at the same time. Think crash of 1987 on steroids. Yellen and the other smart people in the room must know this. You may not agree with their thinking and actions, but some of these people are scary smart.

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Going Nowhere

Well, at least last Wednesday was fun if you were a bull! The Fed raised rates by 1/4% as expected and stocks took off on the premise that there would only be two more interest rate hikes the rest of 2017. That hurt the banks and the economically sensitive sectors and gave a strong push to the defensive sectors. I remain skeptical of only two more hikes and stand by my forecast that four hikes are in the cards this year and the risk is to the upside.

Before the FOMC decision, I offered the model for the day which called for a plus or minus .50% move until 2pm and then volatility with a green close. One of our FOMC trends indicated a 75%+ likelihood that stocks would close higher. With March option expiration also last week and that being a separate and strong upside bias, the market had all of the ingredients for a rally.

However, as is often the case with outsized FOMC-driven moves, those gains or losses are usually reclaimed in the short-term. Through Friday, the S&P 500 has given back all of Wednesday’s gains. In short, the stock market’s pullback continues, however the weakness seems to be more about time than price. The major indices are moving sideways or consolidating instead of declining in price with the exception of the NASDAQ 100 which continues to power ahead, albeit at a slower pace. Both pullback scenarios serve the same purpose and should eventually lead to an upside resolution once the pullback ends, likely by early Q2.

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Fed to Hike Rates Today. Dow 23,000 Still On Track

Model for the Day
As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Three meetings ago was one of the rare times where the models strongly called for a rally on statement which was correct as well as a decline a few days later which was also correct. Today, there is a significant upside edge which has been accurate more than 75% of the time. Stocks also typically see a range of plus or minus .50% until 2 pm before volatility hits and a bigger move is seen.

It’s also March option expiration week which has historically added a nice tailwind to stocks. So far, that tailwind has not been seen which means that the odds favor strength into Friday’s close.

1/4% Hike Against Better Economic Picture
Janet Yellen and her friends at the Fed have done an excellent job of preparing the markets for another rate hike today. After the December increase, the masses were not pricing in a March rate hike although I was very clear 6 weeks ago as well as in my 2017 Fearless Forecast.

“While the market is pricing in at least two rate hikes this year, I think they are on the low side. I would not be surprised to see a minimum of four increases in 2017 with the risk to the upside.”

I would say that today’s move has a 95% certainty. The Fed is going to raise the Federal Funds Rate today by .25%. The economy has definitely improved since the December rate hike and we have had back to back 200,000 jobs reports which are also stronger than at this time last year. The U6 or “real” unemployment rate now stands at 9.20% which is the lowest level since before the Great Recession. The stock market has continued higher. Even data from Europe is a little better.

Velocity of Money Still Collapsing
Turning to an oldie but a goodie, below is very long-term chart of the velocity of money (M2V) produced by the St. Louis Fed. In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.


This single chart definitely speaks to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets.

The Secret Behind Low Rates
Continuing to raise rates, as I have written about over and over, also makes our currency a lot more attractive to foreigners. Remember, money flows where it’s treated best. Since early 2008 here, in Street$marts and on the various financial channels, I have been a devout secular bull for the dollar, even when trillions were being manufactured by the Fed. For years, I sat alone in my bullish house before having company over the past few years.

As I have written about, I truly believe that one of the main reasons Yellen and her inner circle worry about raising rates is because they are terrified of massive capital flows into the U.S. as the dollar index breaks out above par (100) which is already did and travels to 110, 120 and possibly higher, somewhat like tech stocks did during the Dotcom boom. Below is a chart I continue to show at each FOMC meeting. 120 is the next long-term target.


A soaring dollar would be great in the short-term for all except those who export goods. Our standard of living would go up. Companies with U.S.-centric businesses would thrive. Foreigners would buy dollars in staggering amounts at a dizzying pace which I argue would make their way into large and mega cap U.S. stocks. Think Dow 23,000 (my most recent target), 25,000 and possibly 30,000.

What’s so bad about that?
Eventually too much of a good thing becomes problematic. In this case, mass dislocations in the global markets would grow and that would almost certainly lead to a major global financial crisis later this decade. Think many elephants trying to squeeze out of a room at the same time. Think crash of 1987 on steroids. Yellen and the other smart people in the room must know this. You may not agree with their thinking and actions, but some of these people are scary smart.

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Strong Fed Trend Active Today

It doesn’t feel like it’s been six weeks since the December meeting when the FOMC raised interest rates 1/4%, but it really has. Can we get time to stand still for a month or so in order for us all to catch up? With President Trump occupying the headlines on a daily basis, Janet Yellen & Co. must be ecstatic that they out of the limelight and crosshairs for that matter.

Today concludes the Fed’s two day meeting and expectations are for no rate hike, especially after that weaker than expected GDP report last week. While the market is pricing in at least two rate hikes this year, I think they are on the low side. I would not be surprised to see a minimum of four increases in 2017 with the risk to the upside.

However, as you know, I still don’t think the Fed should hike at all. They are fighting a battle that doesn’t yet exist and risking another leg higher in the dollar’s bull market which will have grave long-term consequences. For now, I have been discussing, the dollar’s is seeing a mean reverting move to the downside as it gears up for a bigger rally later in the year.

The model for today’s stock market is plus or minus 0.50% until 2pm and then a rally into the close. One of our Fed models is active today and that suggests at least a 75% chance of a higher close.

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Fed to Hike Rates But All Not Well

Model for the Day

As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Two meetings ago was one of the rare times where the models strongly called for a rally on statement which was correct as well as a decline a few days later which was also correct. Today, the upside edge is just outside a coin flip and certainly not worth playing based solely on this. While it’s also December option expiration week which has historically added a nice tailwind to stocks, that edge has also been a bit muted by the strength seen on Monday and Tuesday. On the bright side, there could be a strong and playable short-term trend to the downside starting by the end of the week, but we will have to see how the next few days play out.

1/4% Hike Against Mixed Economic Picture

Janey Yellen and her friends at the Fed have done an excellent job of preparing the markets for a rate hike today. I would say that it’s a 95% certainty. The Fed is going to raise the Federal Funds Rate today by .25%. Whether you want to attribute it to the Fed making an independent decision based on the economic data at hand or that Donald Trump’s agenda is assumed to be very pro-growth or that Paul Ryan will be running tax policy or even that stocks have become a bit frothy, short-term rates are going up today and next year.

Looking at what the Fed is supposed to be basing their decision, the economy, we see a mixed bag. Over the past three months, we have created 156,000, 161,000 and 178,000 jobs in the U.S which seems pretty good on the surface. However, that’s 200,000 less jobs than 12 months earlier. The manipulated unemployment rate is down to 4.6% with the real or U6 rate at 9.7%. And while the consumer price index (CPI) has finally started to uptick after percolating for years, it’s hardly hot and worrisome. Our economic output, GDP, is improving and now stands at just over 3% which is also finally good news. I fully expect that to click between 3% and 4% in 2017.

Velocity of Money Still Collapsing

Turning to an oldie but a goodie, below is very long-term chart of the velocity of money (M2V) produced by the St. Louis Fed. In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.

This single chart definitely speaks to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets.

The Secret Behind Low Rates

Continuing to raise rates, as I have written about over and over, also makes our currency a lot more attractive to foreigners. Remember, money flows where it’s treated best. Since early 2008 here, in Street$marts and on the various financial channels, I have been a devout secular bull for the dollar, even when trillions were being manufactured by the Fed. For years, I sat alone in my bullish house before having company over the past few years. As I have written about, I truly believe that one of the main reasons Yellen and her inner circle don’t want to raise rates is because they are terrified of massive capital flows into the U.S. as the dollar index breaks out above par (100) which is already did and travels to 110, 120 and possibly higher, somewhat like tech stocks did during the Dotcom boom. Below is a chart I continue to show at each FOMC meeting. 120 is the next long-term target.

A soaring dollar would be great in the short-term for all except those who export goods. Our standard of living would go up. Companies with U.S. centric businesses would thrive. Foreigners would buy dollars in staggering amounts at a dizzying pace which I argue would make their way into large and mega cap U.S. stocks. Think Dow 23,000, 25,000 and possibly 30,000.

What’s so bad about that?

Eventually too much of a good thing becomes problematic. In this case, mass dislocations in the global markets would grow and that would almost certainly lead to a major global financial crisis later this decade. Think many elephants trying to squeeze out of a room at the same time. Think crash of 1987 on steroids. Yellen and the other smart people in the room must know this. You may not agree with their thinking and actions, but some of these people are scary smart.

I understand why the Fed is going to raise rates. I truly do. However, given our current mixed economic picture and the weakness, deflation and accommodative stances of central banks elsewhere, I believe that Yellen and her minions are barking up the wrong tree.

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Fed Model Says Rally. A November Surprise from Yellen?

Before I dive into the meat of the article, our market model for today is a plus or minus .50% move until 2 pm and then a rally into the close. Two of our Fed Statement Day (today) models are live and are very bullish with a success rate of 80%. We’ll see how that works out before long.

With the election just around the corner, it would be almost impossible to believe that the Federal Reserve would raise interest rates at the conclusion of their two-day meeting meeting today at 2 pm. And I do not believe they will move on rates. However, I would have thought the same thing about the FBI going public with their restarting the Clinton email investigation. It’s just been the most precedent setting election season of all-time and it’s not over. Who knows what else comes out between now and Tuesday morning?!?!

The surprise from the September meeting was that there were three public dissenters to the vote. That is the highest number I can recall and a shot across the bow for  Chair Yellen that a move, likely in December, is coming. We’ll see what the vote is today. It’s been pretty amazing that there has been almost none of the usual chatter on Twitter or on the financial channels regarding the meeting. Normally, my feed would be lit up with prognostications and commentary and the media would have multiple segments an hour. Hillary and Donald are sucking up all of the media’s bandwidth.

Looking at the employment picture, the economy created 156,000 new jobs in September and 151,000 in August. That’s certainly not an overheating economy nor an economy on the verge of recession. It’s just below warm. While our economy grew at a higher than expected rate of 2.9% in Q3, that wasn’t enough to balance off a weak 1.1% number for the first half of 2016. Additionally, inflation has been well under wraps not only this year, but every year since the financial crisis.

Long time readers know that I have been in the deflation camp since 2007 and remain that way until we have another recession. I offered comments about the economic indicators not because there are any startling revelations, but as another way to support the position I have taken since 2007. At every single Fed meeting since mid-2007 I have been in the accommodative camp, which meant either lowering rates or keeping them as is after they essentially hit 0%. For the record, I am not in favor of negative interest rates for now.

While the crisis has long passed for the economy and financial markets, we are still in a typical post-financial crisis recovery which I have written about over and over and over. Our economy will remain that way until the other side of the next recession, which should be mild and occur by 2019. That means very uneven growth that sometimes teases and tantalizes on the upside and terrifies once in a while on the downside. It’s very frustrating, more so now because we have complete, total and utter dysfunction in government that makes the Fed the only game in town.

As I have mentioned many, many times over the past few years, not only is Janet Yellen & Company taking into account the U.S. economy, but Europe and Asia as well as they debate policy. We may not directly care what happens abroad, but our currency certainly does. I believe the real reason that Yellen and the smart folks in the room are so scared to raise rates is that it would set in motion something I have been discussing since 2008. That is a tech-like blow off in the dollar only seen during the mid 1980s when globalization was only a fraction of what it is today. You can see this on the left side of the long-term chart below.

Fed officials rarely discuss currencies, but I believe this is something done a lot behind closed doors. Should the dollar take off above 100, which I think is a lock, 110, 120 and even higher become likely and possible. A shorter-term chart is below where you can see the big rally in 2014 and 2015 followed by an 18 month consolidation so far. Once the dollar breaks out to new highs and stays there for a few weeks, 100 or so will become the floor.

dollar

Most of you are probably thinking “so what”. Stronger dollar should equal a higher standard of living. How bad could a strong dollar be? That is true. However, there are all kinds of chain reactions to understand.

A surging dollar would mean a collapsing euro, yen and pound. Along with my long-term dollar and Dow forecasts, I also have predicted the euro to parity against the dollar on its way to sub 80. The pound looks like it will see the 90s with the yen eventually declining another 25-50% from here.

With those central banks easing and/or accommodative, how could they fight back? While exports would benefit, their standard of living would further suffer. Much more importantly, I believe we would see massive capital outflows from much of the world into the U.S. First, this would manifest itself in short-term treasuries. I then believe money would flow into large and mega cap blue chip stocks along with real estate. That would make my longstanding target of Dow 20,000 seem bearish. I wouldn’t rule out 25,000 or even higher under that scenario.

While a stock market melt up would be enjoyed for a time, these massive capital flows and currency collapses would likely lead to historic market dislocations around the globe ending worse than the crash of 1987. In other words, it’s all good until it’s not and then look out as the elephants all try to exit the room at once.

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Fed Trend Says Sell but Fedex Gives Thumbs Up

After Thursday’s strength, one of our post-FOMC trading systems gave a sell signal and that calls for weakness over the next 3-5 days. This has a high degree of accuracy, greater than 75%. If stocks rally further on Friday, it will trigger another trend calling for lower prices with a hit rate above 85%.

If correct, this should just be a quick and relatively mild bout of weakness that can be bought for another move to new highs on the way to Dow 19,000 and then 20,000. After all, NYSE breadth the past two days has been very powerful and high yield bonds continue to rally. Leadership, while strong, has been a little schizophrenic this week, but something I am worried about at all.

I rarely mention bellwether stocks, but Federal Express caught my attention as it broke out this week. This single stock has a pretty good track record of forecasting the broad market. Unless the breakout fails somewhat immediately, we have yet another confirming sign of higher prices to come.

Get ready to hear from the doomsday crowd next about how the US dollar is doomed and China is taking over because their currency finally gets included in the SDR. It’s 100% NONSENSE from where I sit. One day, the dollar will no longer be the world’s reserve currency, but it certainly isn’t now or even by 2030!

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