Not So Special Fed Day Update. Recession & Bear Market

Normally, I send out a very detailed update when the Federal Reserve concludes their every 6 week meeting. Given the volume of updates I have published lately, I am sure most of you have a little Paul Schatz fatigue. So for someone not known for brevity as my colleague,Renee, says all the time, I am going to keep this short and to the point and then work on a very important Canaries in the Coal Mine.

The Fed concludes their two-day meeting today with the statement released at 2 pm est. Jay Powell and company are not going to raise short-term interest rates today. In the statement, I do expect them to remain hawkish and set the table for another rate hike at their final meeting of 2018 next month. The economy continues to grow and perform very well over the past five quarters with an incredibly strong employment report from October that included 250,000 new jobs, a 50 year low in U-3 unemployment and annual wage growth over 3%. That’s about as good as it gets. Tax reform and deregulation are certainly working economically.

With all that said, nothing has changed in my forecast for a mild and consumer-driven recession beginning between Q3 2019 and Q3 2020.

The Fed’s DNA will be all over it. Right now, I am concerned about auto loans and credit card delinquencies as well as mortgage rates. The housing market is softening or outright turning down. Some dismiss that because tax reform is hurting states with high state and local taxes. I don’t like to qualify data. For whatever reason, something is wrong in housing.

The stock market model for today for today is to see stocks trade between plus and minus .50% until 2pm and then a rally. However, with the huge move over the past 7 days, that trend has been muted to but a coin flip. There is a chance to see a negative trend develop for the next few days, but I need to see where stocks close today.

Finally (see I can be brief!), I wanted to show you the last time the day after a mid-term had such a huge move. You had to go all the way back to Ronald Reagan, my favorite modern day president, in 1982 when stocks soared 4% after the GOP lost House seats but gained a Senate seat. What happened back then is very different from now as August 1982 was the dawning of the great 1980s bull market after a 14 year slumber. Sentiment was close to an all-time low. Few owned stocks or even cared.

I am sticking by my bold forecast that if stocks race right back to new highs, the bull market that began in 2009 will end in Q1 2019. More on this next week when I publish the long awaited Canaries in the Coal Mine.

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***Fed Update – Rates Going Up Today. More to Follow***

Stock Market Behavior Models for the Day

As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Over the past few meetings, many of the strongest trends were muted and today looks a lot like the August 1 meeting day. I drew arrows below so you can see what the S&P 500 looked like heading into the Fed’s statement day which is today.

In both cases, stocks were just off of their highs. In August, stocks rallied and declined before beginning another leg higher. I wouldn’t be at all surprised if stocks saw a quick pullback this week followed by another rally attempt next week that ultimately fails.

As with most statement days, the model for the day calls for stocks to return plus or minus 0.50% until 2:00 PM. There is a 90% chance that occurs. If the stock market opens outside of that range which seems very unlikely today, there is a strong trend to see stocks move in the opposite direction until 2:00 PM. For example, if the Dow opens down 1%, the model says to buy at the open and hold until at least 2:00 PM. There is a strong trend in play for stocks to rally on statement day and especially after 2 PM.

Powell & Co. Set to Hike

After raising interest rates by 0.25% 6 weeks ago, Jay Powell and company will be at it again today by hiking rates another 0.25%. Markets have fully priced this in and have begun to price in another 0.25% at the last meeting of the year in December. This continues to fit perfectly within our forecast for 3.5 rates hikes in 2018 with the risk to the upside. All eyes and ears will be waiting for the Fed’s forecast of rate hikes in 2019 which now stands at two. Investors will also be parsing the statement and listening to the Powell Q& A session on the economic impact of tariffs and tax reform.

While I doubt there will be much if any mention of the Fed’s sale of assets purchased during the Quantitative Easing programs, it should be noted that the pace of sales increases next month. That’s another potential drag on liquidity in the system that may take the markets some time to adjust to.

Economically, things remain firm right now on the back of tax reform, reduced regulation and massive repatriation of corporate cash.  We have strong Q2 GDP growth although Q3 will be much more challenging, record corporate profits, inflation back up in the zone and more jobs open than people to fill them. Consumer confidence and consumer sentiment are at or near record highs. Even wage growth is moving higher. Only the tariffs are holding back the economy and I think that may resolve itself favorably after the November elections.

In many ways, it doesn’t get much better than this. Reread that last sentence. That’s the one that concerns me a little bit, not so much for the next few quarters, but certainly as we get into the middle of 2019. If it can’t get much better than this, it only has one way to go although recessions do not begin with data like this. It takes time for bad behavior to permeate the system and confidence to become exuberance, but we are close!

They Just Don’t Get It

To reiterate what I have said for more than a year but a little more bluntly, the Fed is misguided, arrogant and in desperate need of help. NEVER before have they sold balance sheet holdings in the open market AND raised interest rates. In fact, I don’t think it’s ever been done in the world before. So why on earth do they believe they will so easily be successful? This grand experiment is going to end poorly and we are all going to suffer at the hands of the next recession which I stabbed in the dark as beginning between mid 2019 and mid 2020.

Yes, with banks holding $2.5 trillion on their balance sheets, the recession should be mild and look nothing like 2007-2009. And yes, this expansion will be more than 10 years old. And yes, there will be some external trigger like 9-11 or the S&L Crisis to push the economy over. This time, it could be tariffs or a European banking crisis. But the Fed will have greased the skids sufficiently for the economy to recess.

Let’s remember that the Fed was asleep at the wheel before the 1987 crash. In fact, Alan Greenspan, one of the worst Fed chairs of all-time, actually raised interest rates just before that fateful day, stepping on the throat of liquidity and turning a routine bull market correction into a 30% bear market and crash. In 1998 before Russia defaulted on her debt and Long Term Capital almost took down the entire financial system, the Fed was raising rates again. Just after the Dotcom Bubble burst in March 2000, ole Alan started hiking rates in May 2000. And let’s not even go to 2007 where Ben Bernanke whom I view as one of the greats, proclaimed that there would be no contagion from the sub prime mortgage collapse.

Yes. The Fed needs to stop.

Velocity of Money Most Important

Below is a chart I have shown at least quarterly since 2008. With the exception of a brief period from mid 2009 to mid 2010, the velocity of money collapsed. It’s still too early to conclude, but it does look like it stopped going down in 2017 and might be just slightly starting to turn up as you can see on the second chart of M2V since 2008. If 2017 does turn out to be the bottom, this would also coincide with the bottom of the commodity cycle which I have discussed and should lead to a massive commodity boom over the coming decade, especially in the non-energy products.

In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a disastrous bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.

These two charts definitely speak to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. The economy has been suffering for many years and will not fully recover and function normally until money velocity rallies. This is one chart the Fed should be focused on all of the time.

It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets. It continues to boggle my mind why no one called the Fed out on this and certainly not Powell so far at his quarterly press conferences.

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***SPECIAL Fed Update – It Doesn’t Get Much Better Than This***

Stock Market Behavior Models for the Day

As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Over the past few meetings, many of the strongest trends were muted but today is at least a little different.

As with most statement days, the model for the day calls for stocks to return plus or minus 0.50% until 2:00 PM. There is a 90% chance that occurs. If the stock market opens outside of that range which seems very unlikely today, there is a strong trend to see stocks move in the opposite direction until 2:00 PM. For example, if the Dow opens down 1%, the model says to buy at the open and hold until at least 2:00 PM.

Last meeting stocks rallied to their highest level in 50 days, thereby muting a strong trend. Today, we do not have the same regime. There is a strong trend in play for stocks to rally on statement day and especially after 2 PM.

After the last meeting on June 13, I mentioned that a trend may be in play for stocks to decline. That trend ended up working out very well as the S&P 500 went from 2780 to 2700 in the two weeks after the meeting. That trend is very unlikely to be active after today.

Powell & Co. to Stand Pat Today

After raising interest rates by 0.25% 6 weeks ago, Jay Powell and company won’t be undertaking any action after today’s meeting.  Markets will be paying very close attention to the statement released for clues about the Fed’s thinking for the rest of 2018. As I have mentioned all year, the likelihood is for four rates hikes this year with the next two coming in September and December. I just continue to chuckle and shake my head when I recall how many pundits changed their views to two or even a single rate hike when stocks were declining in February. They were better off just saying they didn’t have strong conviction rather than chase interest rates like lemmings.

That’s the problem with the vast majority of analysts; they focus too much on what is currently happening and lose sight of the intermediate-term and the big picture. Then, they get amnesia and revise history to never be wrong. I have never had a problem standing by forecasts, even when I end up being wrong. It’s all part of the business. Some I get right with precision accuracy while others I have fall flat on my face. Get up, move on and learn.

Economically, things are pretty firm right now with strong Q2 GDP growth, record corporate profits, inflation back up in the zone and more jobs open than people to fill them. Consumer confidence and consumer sentiment are at or near record highs. Only the tariffs are holding back the economy. In some way, it doesn’t get much better than this. Reread that last sentence. That’s the one that concerns me a little bit, not so much for the next few quarters, but certainly as we get into the middle of 2019. If it can’t get much better than this, it only has one way to go although recessions do not begin with data like this. It takes time for bad behavior to permeate the system and confidence to become exuberance.

Fed Arrogance & Ignorance Keeps on Truckin’

To reiterate what I have said for more than a year but a little more bluntly, the Fed is misguided, arrogant and in desperate need of help. NEVER before have they sold balance sheet holdings in the open market AND raised interest rates. In fact, I don’t think it’s ever been done in the world before. So why on earth do they believe they will so easily be successful? This grand experiment is going to end poorly and we are all going to suffer at the hands of the next recession which I stabbed in the dark as beginning between mid 2019 and mid 2020.

Yes, with banks holding $2.5 trillion on their balance sheets, the recession should be mild and look nothing like 2007-2009. And yes, this expansion will be more than 10 years old. And yes, there will be some external trigger like 9-11 or the S&L Crisis to push the economy over. This time, it could be tariffs or a European banking crisis. But the Fed will have greased the skids sufficiently for the economy to recess.

Let’s remember that the Fed was asleep at the wheel before the 1987 crash. In fact, Alan Greenspan, one of the worst Fed chairs of all-time, actually raised interest rates just before that fateful day, stepping on the throat of liquidity and turning a routine bull market correction into a 30% bear market and crash. In 1998 before Russia defaulted on her debt and Long Term Capital almost took down the entire financial system, the Fed was raising rates again. Just after the Dotcom Bubble burst in March 2000, ole Alan started hiking rates in May 2000. And let’s not even go to 2007 where Ben Bernanke whom I view as one of the greats, proclaimed that there would be no contagion from the sub prime mortgage collapse.

Yes. The Fed needs to stop.

Velocity of Money Most Important

Below is a chart I have shown at least quarterly since 2008. With the exception of a brief period from mid 2009 to mid 2010, the velocity of money collapsed. It’s still too early to conclude, but it does look like it stopped going down in 2017 and might be just slightly starting to turn up as you can see on the second chart of M2V since 2008. If 2017 does turn out to be the bottom, this would also coincide with the bottom of the commodity cycle which I have discussed and should lead to a massive commodity boom over the coming decade, especially in the non-energy products.

In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a disastrous bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.

These two charts definitely speak to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. The economy has been suffering for many years and will not fully recover and function normally until money velocity rallies. This is one chart the Fed should be focused on all of the time.

It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets. It continues to boggle my mind why no one called the Fed out on this and certainly not Powell so far at his quarterly press conferences.

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***SPECIAL Fed Update – Continued Arrogance & Pomposity Spells Recession***

Stock Market Behavior Models for the Day

As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Over the past few meetings, many of the strongest trends were muted and today is no different.

As with most statement days, the model for the day calls for stocks to return plus or minus 0.50% until 2:00 PM. There is a 90% chance that occurs. If the stock market opens outside of that range, there is a strong trend to see stocks move in the opposite direction until 2:00 PM. For example, if the Dow opens down 1%, the model says to buy at the open and hold until at least 2:00 PM.

With stocks  rallying strongly and closing at the highest level in more than 50 days, the usual post 2:00 PM rally has been reduced to slightly more than a coin flip, not exactly the big edge we are used to trading. However, with this strength, an opportunity for a decline opens up depending on how stocks close today.

Second Rate Hike of 2018  Today

The Fed is going to raise the Federal Funds Rate by 0.25% today. That’s almost 100% certain. Markets will be paying very close attention to the statement and Q&A from Chairman Jay Powell to glean what’s on their mind the rest of the year. With the usual Q1 sub-par GDP growth out of the way, Q2 and Q3 look to be much stronger. Additionally, May inflation numbers came in a little hot on both the consumer (CPI) and producer (PPI) side. With the PPI outpacing the CPI, companies are not able to fully pass along price increases to the consumer which is good for the consumer but not so good for companies who will see their margins squeezed somewhat. In turn, this could put some pressure on earnings down the road.

Back in January, I forecast 3.5 rate hikes this year with the risk to the upside. I am standing by that and I haven’t wavered for even a day when the pundits were out in full force during the February stock market decline cutting their rate hike forecasts to just one more in 2018. That’s the problem with the vast majority of analysts; they focus too much on what is currently happening and lose sight of the intermediate-term and the big picture. Then, they get amnesia and revise history to never be wrong. I have never had a problem standing by forecasts, even when I end up being wrong. It’s all part of the business. Some I get with precision accuracy while others I have fallen flat on my face. Get up, move on and learn.

Anyway, the likely scenario is another hike in September as well as December where I look for the Fed to begin patting themselves on the back for a job well done.

To reiterate what I have said for more than a year but a little more bluntly, the Fed is misguided, arrogant and in desperate need of help. NEVER before have they sold balance sheet holdings in the open market AND raised interest rates. In fact, I don’t think it’s ever been done in the world before. So why on earth do they believe they will so easily be successful? This grand experiment is going to end poorly and we are all going to suffer at the hands of the next recession which I stabbed in the dark as beginning between mid 2019 and mid 2020.

Yes, with banks holding $2.5 trillion on their balance sheets, the recession should be mild and look nothing like 2007-2009. And yes, this expansion will be more than 10 years old. And yes, there will be some external trigger like 9-11 or the S&L Crisis to push the economy over. But the Fed will have greased the skids sufficiently for the economy to recess.

Let’s remember that the Fed was asleep at the wheel before the 1987 crash. In fact, Alan Greenspan, one of the worst Fed chairs of all-time, actually raised interest rates just before that fateful day, stepping on the throat of liquidity and turning a routine bull market correction into a 30% bear market and crash. In 1998 before Russia defaulted on her debt and Long Term Capital almost took down the entire financial system, the Fed was raising rates again. Just after the Dotcom Bubble burst in March 2000, ole Alan started hiking rates in May 2000. And let’s not even go to 2007 where Ben Bernanke whom I view as one of the greats, proclaimed that there would be no contagion from the sub prime mortgage collapse.

Yes. The Fed needs to stop.

Velocity of Money Most Important

Below is a chart I have shown at least quarterly since 2008. With the exception of a brief period from mid 2009 to mid 2010, the velocity of money collapsed. It’s still too early to conclude, but it does look like it stopped going down in 2017 and might be just slightly starting to turn up as you can see on the second chart of M2V since 2008. If 2017 does turn out to be the bottom, this would also coincide with the bottom of the commodity cycle which I have discussed and should lead to a massive commodity boom over the coming decade, especially in the non-energy products.

In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a disastrous bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.

These two charts definitely speak to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. The economy has been suffering for many years and will not fully recover and function normally until money velocity rallies. This is one chart the Fed should be focused on all of the time.

It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets. It continues to boggle my mind why no one called the Fed out on this and certainly not Yellen at her quarterly press conferences. Hopefully, someone will question Chairman Powell on this today.

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Boring Fed Day On Tap

Model for the Day

As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Six meetings ago was one of the rare times where the models strongly called for a rally on statement day which was correct as well as a decline a few days later which was also correct.

Today, as with most statement days, the first model calls for stocks to return plus or minus 0.50% until 2:00 PM. There is a 90% chance that occurs. The next model calls for stocks to close higher today and rally after 2:00 PM. That is usually a very strong trend, 75%+, however with the bulls using a lot of energy over the past few weeks, that trend’s power has been muted significantly to less than 50%. That’s not exactly the kind of trend worth trading.

Finally, there may be a trend setting up for a post statement day decline, but there are a number of factors that still need to line up.

No Rate Hike But Balance Sheet Taper…

Janet Yellen and her friends at the Fed have done an excellent job of preparing the markets for interest rate hikes this year. There haven’t been any surprises on that front. Recently, they have been chatting up a storm regarding a plan to reduce the size of the Fed’s $4 trillion plus balance sheet. You can expect to hear a little more about this in their statement today after they leave rates unchanged. With the Fed’s annual Jackson Hole retreat about a month away, Yellen and Company should continue to prepare the markets for a formal announcement in six weeks with lots of information released at Jackson Hole.

 

Velocity of Money Still Collapsing

Turning to a chart I continue to show time and time again, below is a long-term chart of the velocity of money (M2V) produced by the St. Louis Fed. In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.

This single chart definitely speaks to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets.

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Stocks Looking Down After Rate Hike

Everything happened as expected on Wednesday. Stocks stayed in a tight range until 2PM. The Fed raised rates. Yellen spoke about reducing the balance sheet. And the bullish Fed trend was significantly muted. Given how stocks closed, there is a very short-term trend which indicates lower prices today and possibly into next week. However, with the stock market set to open lower, the opportunity to take advantage is likely gone.

The Dow is now the leading index and that’s not the index which typically leads in the healthiest of markets. I don’t expect this to continue. Mid caps have really started stepping up with small caps not looking as dead as they did a short time ago. The NASDAQ 100, on the other hand, looks like it has more downside ahead with some sideways movement coming after that.

As I always say, it’s not what the news actually is, but rather how stocks react. On Fed day, we saw good behavior from industrials, healthcare, home builders, banks, staples, discretionary, REITs and utilities. Read that sentence again. For the most part, those are not the same leaders as we have seen. Rather than the rally ending, it looks like it’s morphing after two “shock” days (big down days out of nowhere) in tech over the past month.

Now, tech may be done leading for a while, but it doesn’t look like the rally is over. Sure, we could see a pullback, but that would be yet another buying opportunity in a long line of successful opportunities.

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Fed to Hike Rates Today In Spite of Falling Inflation. Dow 23,000 Next

Model for the Day

As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Five meetings ago was one of the rare times where the models strongly called for a rally on statement day which was correct as well as a decline a few days later which was also correct.

Today, as with most statement days, the first model calls for stocks to return plus or minus 0.50% until 2:00 PM. There is a 90% chance that occurs. The next model calls for stocks to close higher today and rally after 2:00 PM. That is usually a very strong trend, 75%, however with the bulls using a lot of energy over the past few days, that trend’s power has been muted significantly.

Finally, there may be a trend setting up for a post statement day decline, but there are a number of factors that still need to line up.

It’s also June option expiration week which has historically added a nice tailwind to stocks. So far, that tailwind has been seen just on Tuesday.

1/4% Hike Against Mixed Economic Picture

Janet Yellen and her friends at the Fed have done an excellent job of preparing the markets for another rate hike today. They have been chatting up a storm in their speeches and it’s also Yellen’s quarterly news conference and economic outlook update. I would be shocked if more than Neel Kashkari dissented.

While most pundits forecast two rate hikes in 2017, I have been very clear that those expectations are too low. In my 2017 Fearless Forecast, I offered that,

“While the market is pricing in at least two rate hikes this year, I think they are on the low side. I would not be surprised to see a minimum of four increases in 2017 with the risk to the upside.”

The flaw in my thinking is that I did not believe a change in the balance sheet would be a 2017 event. We will likely hear otherwise from Janet Yellen today. Markets are expecting to learn of a plan outline to begin to curb asset purchases by the Fed sooner than later. That should eventually lead to letting assets organically roll off the balance sheet rather than outright sales in the open market. The markets would be very surprised and caught off guard if Yellen speaks about a plan to sell bonds in the open market any time soon.

I would say that today’s move has a 95%+ certainty. The Fed is going to raise the Federal Funds Rate today by .25%. Banks will then raise the prime lending rate and other rates will move off that. While the economy continues to improve, Q1 GDP was less than stellar although recently revised higher. My own work suggests that Q2 could see GDP grow close to 3% with Q3 perhaps even higher.

Monthly job creation has been very strong in four of the past five months. Only March was a lemon. I expect the growth trend to continue. The official unemployment rate hasn’t been lower since 2001 and the “real” rate or U6 is down to 8.4%, the lowest since 2007. This data certainly support a hike.

The chink in the armor and what Neel Kashkari may cite if he votes against the hike is the recent decline in inflation. From a 5 year high of 2.7% in February, the consumer price index declined in March, April and May to 1.9%. That is exactly what the Fed does not want to see as it tries to normalize interest rates.

Velocity of Money Still Collapsing

Turning to a chart I continue to show time and time again, below is a long-term chart of the velocity of money (M2V) produced by the St. Louis Fed. In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.

This single chart definitely speaks to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets.

The Secret Behind Low Rates

Continuing to raise rates, as I have written about over and over, also makes our currency a lot more attractive to foreigners. Remember, money flows where it’s treated best. Since early 2008 here, in www.investfortomorrowblog.com and on the various financial channels, I have been a devout secular bull for the dollar, even when trillions were being manufactured by the Fed. For years, I sat alone in my bullish house before having company over the past few years.

As I have written about, I truly believe that one of the main reasons Yellen and her inner circle worry about raising rates is because they are terrified of massive capital flows into the U.S. as the dollar index breaks out above par (100) which is already did and travels to 110, 120 and possibly higher, somewhat like tech stocks did during the Dotcom boom.

Below is a chart I continue to show at each FOMC meeting. While Dollar Index bounced around between the blue lines after that huge rally on the left side of the chart, all was very well and that was normal and expected behavior. When price broke above the blue line late last year, I thought the next big move had started. I was clearly and definitely wrong.

In the strongest bull markets, price should not have declined much below 100. This has been an unexpected turn for the worse. However, I am not ready nor close to being ready to abandon my long-term positive position. If my view is going to continue to pan out, the dollar will likely spend some time going sideways before gathering itself for a run to 104 and then much higher in 2018 and 2019.

I still forecast that the final bull market price peak lies ahead and at least towards the 120 level. Nothing has changed in my long-term view that the Euro will ultimately fall to all-time lows below .80 and the Pound under par. Those are the same long-term targets from 2008.

A soaring dollar would be great in the short-term for all except those who export goods. Our standard of living would go up. Companies with U.S.-centric businesses would thrive. Foreigners would buy dollars in staggering amounts at a dizzying pace which I argue would make their way into large and mega cap U.S. stocks. Think Dow 23,000 (my most recent target), 25,000 and possibly 30,000.

What’s so bad about that?

Eventually too much of a good thing becomes problematic. In this case, mass dislocations in the global markets would grow and that would almost certainly lead to a major global financial crisis later this decade. Think many elephants trying to squeeze out of a room at the same time. Think crash of 1987 on steroids. Yellen and the other smart people in the room must know this. You may not agree with their thinking and actions, but some of these people are scary smart.

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Going Nowhere

Well, at least last Wednesday was fun if you were a bull! The Fed raised rates by 1/4% as expected and stocks took off on the premise that there would only be two more interest rate hikes the rest of 2017. That hurt the banks and the economically sensitive sectors and gave a strong push to the defensive sectors. I remain skeptical of only two more hikes and stand by my forecast that four hikes are in the cards this year and the risk is to the upside.

Before the FOMC decision, I offered the model for the day which called for a plus or minus .50% move until 2pm and then volatility with a green close. One of our FOMC trends indicated a 75%+ likelihood that stocks would close higher. With March option expiration also last week and that being a separate and strong upside bias, the market had all of the ingredients for a rally.

However, as is often the case with outsized FOMC-driven moves, those gains or losses are usually reclaimed in the short-term. Through Friday, the S&P 500 has given back all of Wednesday’s gains. In short, the stock market’s pullback continues, however the weakness seems to be more about time than price. The major indices are moving sideways or consolidating instead of declining in price with the exception of the NASDAQ 100 which continues to power ahead, albeit at a slower pace. Both pullback scenarios serve the same purpose and should eventually lead to an upside resolution once the pullback ends, likely by early Q2.

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Fed to Hike Rates Today. Dow 23,000 Still On Track

Model for the Day
As with every Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) statement day, there is a model for the stock market to follow pre and post announcement. Certain environments have very strong tendencies while others do not. Three meetings ago was one of the rare times where the models strongly called for a rally on statement which was correct as well as a decline a few days later which was also correct. Today, there is a significant upside edge which has been accurate more than 75% of the time. Stocks also typically see a range of plus or minus .50% until 2 pm before volatility hits and a bigger move is seen.

It’s also March option expiration week which has historically added a nice tailwind to stocks. So far, that tailwind has not been seen which means that the odds favor strength into Friday’s close.

1/4% Hike Against Better Economic Picture
Janet Yellen and her friends at the Fed have done an excellent job of preparing the markets for another rate hike today. After the December increase, the masses were not pricing in a March rate hike although I was very clear 6 weeks ago as well as in my 2017 Fearless Forecast.

“While the market is pricing in at least two rate hikes this year, I think they are on the low side. I would not be surprised to see a minimum of four increases in 2017 with the risk to the upside.”

I would say that today’s move has a 95% certainty. The Fed is going to raise the Federal Funds Rate today by .25%. The economy has definitely improved since the December rate hike and we have had back to back 200,000 jobs reports which are also stronger than at this time last year. The U6 or “real” unemployment rate now stands at 9.20% which is the lowest level since before the Great Recession. The stock market has continued higher. Even data from Europe is a little better.

Velocity of Money Still Collapsing
Turning to an oldie but a goodie, below is very long-term chart of the velocity of money (M2V) produced by the St. Louis Fed. In the easiest terms, M2V measures how many times one unit of currency is turned over a period of time in the economy. As you can see, it’s been in a bear market since 1998 which just so happens to be the year where the Internet starting becoming a real force in the economy. Although it did uptick during the housing boom as rates went up, it turned out to be just a bounce before the collapse continued right to the present.


This single chart definitely speaks to some structural problems in the financial system. Money is not getting turned over and desperately needs to. It would be interesting to see the impact if the Fed stopped paying banks for keeping reserves with the Fed. That could presumably force money out from the Fed and into loans or other performing assets.

The Secret Behind Low Rates
Continuing to raise rates, as I have written about over and over, also makes our currency a lot more attractive to foreigners. Remember, money flows where it’s treated best. Since early 2008 here, in Street$marts and on the various financial channels, I have been a devout secular bull for the dollar, even when trillions were being manufactured by the Fed. For years, I sat alone in my bullish house before having company over the past few years.

As I have written about, I truly believe that one of the main reasons Yellen and her inner circle worry about raising rates is because they are terrified of massive capital flows into the U.S. as the dollar index breaks out above par (100) which is already did and travels to 110, 120 and possibly higher, somewhat like tech stocks did during the Dotcom boom. Below is a chart I continue to show at each FOMC meeting. 120 is the next long-term target.


A soaring dollar would be great in the short-term for all except those who export goods. Our standard of living would go up. Companies with U.S.-centric businesses would thrive. Foreigners would buy dollars in staggering amounts at a dizzying pace which I argue would make their way into large and mega cap U.S. stocks. Think Dow 23,000 (my most recent target), 25,000 and possibly 30,000.

What’s so bad about that?
Eventually too much of a good thing becomes problematic. In this case, mass dislocations in the global markets would grow and that would almost certainly lead to a major global financial crisis later this decade. Think many elephants trying to squeeze out of a room at the same time. Think crash of 1987 on steroids. Yellen and the other smart people in the room must know this. You may not agree with their thinking and actions, but some of these people are scary smart.

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Strong Fed Trend Active Today

It doesn’t feel like it’s been six weeks since the December meeting when the FOMC raised interest rates 1/4%, but it really has. Can we get time to stand still for a month or so in order for us all to catch up? With President Trump occupying the headlines on a daily basis, Janet Yellen & Co. must be ecstatic that they out of the limelight and crosshairs for that matter.

Today concludes the Fed’s two day meeting and expectations are for no rate hike, especially after that weaker than expected GDP report last week. While the market is pricing in at least two rate hikes this year, I think they are on the low side. I would not be surprised to see a minimum of four increases in 2017 with the risk to the upside.

However, as you know, I still don’t think the Fed should hike at all. They are fighting a battle that doesn’t yet exist and risking another leg higher in the dollar’s bull market which will have grave long-term consequences. For now, I have been discussing, the dollar’s is seeing a mean reverting move to the downside as it gears up for a bigger rally later in the year.

The model for today’s stock market is plus or minus 0.50% until 2pm and then a rally into the close. One of our Fed models is active today and that suggests at least a 75% chance of a higher close.

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